One of the Prettiest Sears Homes I Ever Did See…

Last year in early June, I drove all through Charlotte, NC and despite spending more than three hours in that city, I found only a handful of kit homes.

And then yesterday, Andrew Mutch sent me a link to this kit house in Charlotte that’s currently for sale, and not only is it a Sears House, but it’s a Corona!

The Corona was described as a “True Bungalow” and that may be the most accurate description that ever appeared in the Sears Modern Homes catalog. It was a classic Arts & Crafts bungalow, and was full of quirky, unique and stunning features that would warm the cockles of any bungalow lover’s heart.

Sometime in Fall 2013, I’ll be in the Charlotte area (again) and I’d love to see this house “in the flesh.” Plus, the presence of this house tells me that despite spending three hours in Charlotte NC, I must have missed the “sweet spot” of kit homes.

Many thanks to Sharon Yoxsimer (Realtor in Charlotte, NC) for giving me permission to use these photos at my website. To visit Sharon’s website, click here.

And unspeakable thanks to the home’s owners who have done such a stellar job of keeping their home in original condition. The photos below tell a story of a painstaking, thorough and breath-taking restoration. This home is a beauty!

To read more about the other Sears Homes in Charlotte, click here.

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The Corona was one of my favorites. It truly was a classic bungalow.

The Corona was one of my favorites. It truly was a classic bungalow.

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Corona

Notice the beamed ceilings in the living room and dining room (shown here by dotted lines). In the living room, there were built-in bookcases with leaded glass doors flanking the fireplace. The kitchen had a breakfast nook (two benches and table).

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It was a very spacious house, too!

The original floorplan provided for five bedrooms, three upstairs and two down.

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Corona

The distinctive features of the Corona are that cross-gabled front porch roof and the gabled dormer that is actually centered squarely on the primary roof. Also note the lites (small panes of glass) over the living room window. These are also present on the dining room window. (Photo is copyright 2013 Sharon Yoxsimer and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.)

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An image from the 1921 catalog shows that centered dormer.

The 1921 catalog shows that centered dormer, and the lites over the living room window.

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Beautiful front porch

The front porch looks like something out of a magazine. I'd love to know where the rock in those columns came from. Are they native stone? And check out the vintage fixtures. (Photo is copyright 2013 Sharon Yoxsimer and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.)

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licing room

Lots of built-ins in the dining room, too. Notice the book-case colonnades that separate the living room from the dining room. The Corona also offered solid oak wainscoting for the dining room, topped with plate rail. What a fine home! (Photo is copyright 2013 Sharon Yoxsimer and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.)

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house

A view of the fireplace shows the built-in bookcases. (Photo is copyright 2013 Sharon Yoxsimer and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.)

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Room

I'm not sure which room this in, and I doubt that this is an original fireplace, but it sure is a beauty! This particular mantel and tiled-surround is too fancy for your typical Sears House, but it fits right in with the "True Bungalow Effect." (Photo is copyright 2013 Sharon Yoxsimer and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.)

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Another fireplace thats just too nice for a little kit house, but

Another fireplace that's just too nice for a little kit house, but as with the other, it is beautiful and fits right in. Only a die-hard purist such as myself would figure out that it's not original. And in fact, it is a beautiful match to the surrounding wainscoting. (Photo is copyright 2013 Sharon Yoxsimer and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.)

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And if you look real close at the inlaid wood ove the mantel, youll see a Sears Solace.

And if you look real close at the inlaid wood over the mantel, you'll see a Sears Solace.

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house

This is the kitchen but it's been significantly enlarged. When built, the Corona had a kitchen that was a mere 8 feet by 13 feet. That's pretty tiny. (Photo is copyright 2013 Sharon Yoxsimer and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.)

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Kitchens been updated.

Older kitchens are notoriously dark but this space looks like it's awash in light. I'd love to know how they created all this extra space! (Photo is copyright 2013 Sharon Yoxsimer and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.)

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Before the remodel, the kitchen probably looked a lot like this.

Before the remodel, the kitchen probably looked a lot like this.

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house house

This appears to be the first-floor bathroom, complete with a water-saver toilet and Kohler Memoirs sink. Nice touches, and the claw-foot tub was in vogue when this house was built. (Photo is copyright 2013 Sharon Yoxsimer and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.)

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The original Corona bathroom (as seen in the 1918 catalog) would have looked something like this.

The original Corona bathroom (1918 catalog) would have looked something like this.

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Also in the 1918 catalog is a picture of the homeowners little girl, tending to Dollies croupy cough, by running lots of hot water in the dual-faucet sink. This was a big breakthrough in modern American housing, to have not only running water, but steamy hot water on tap! The old folks stories of taking a hot tub bath in the kitchen every Saturday night was based on the fact that a hot water resevoir was attached to the side of the old cast-iron cook stove.

Also in the 1918 catalog is a picture of the homeowner's little girl, tending to Dollie's croupy cough, by running hot water in the sink. This was a big breakthrough in "modern American housing," to have not only running water, but steamy hot water on tap! I love this picture, but I'm not sure if the little Mommy is dealing with Dollie's upper respiratory infection or maybe Dollie said a bad word and she's getting her mouth washed out with soap. Given Dollie's body language and facial expression, plus the bar of soap nearby, I'd say she got caught saying "the mother of all bad words."

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house in Corona

The Corona in Charlotte has two full bathrooms. This appears to be a second-floor bathroom, tucked in neatly under the eaves. Notice the hexagon tile with the black border, and the subway tile on the walls. Nice touches. The bathroom sink and faucets are a nice reporduction, but they're actually pre-Corona (1916). However, I can forgive that little detail. 🙂 (Photo is copyright 2013 Sharon Yoxsimer and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.)

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bathroom

I'm not sure where this bathroom is located, but it may be another angle of the second-floor bathroom shown in the picture above. Very nicely done. (Photo is copyright 2013 Sharon Yoxsimer and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.)

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In all my travels, I have never seen a Sears kit home with a transom on an interior door, so I suspect these were added, but they are very practical and in this case, beautifully done and a nice addition.

In all my travels, I have never seen a Sears kit home with a transom on an interior door, so I suspect these were added, but they are very practical and in this case, beautifully done and a good-looking addition. (Photo is copyright 2013 Sharon Yoxsimer and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.)

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To read more about the Corona, click here.

To read about the other kit homes I found in Charlotte, NC, tap here.

BTW, I was kidding about that “Sears Solace” on the mantel top.  🙂

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5 Comments

  1. Rachel Shoemaker

    A Sears Solace in 1917? LOL.

    I wonder how many Sears enthusiasts will be fooled by THAT one? That’s great!

  2. Angela

    WOW, please excuse me as I remove my jaw from the floor. This has to be one of the most beautiful houses I have ever seen.

    If I had the means I would pick it up and move it to the Lehigh Valley.

    Those homeowners are my heroes. And Rose, this has to be my favorite blog post yet. I love your speculation on the little girl’s dolly. I bet she didn’t say fuuuuuuuuuuuuudgggge!

  3. Mark Hardin

    Beautiful Home!

  4. ShariD

    Or, maybe Dolly got caught EATING the fudge and has it all over her little face!

    Needs a good washing up after that! LOL

    GORGEOUS HOUSE – I’m sending the link to this to my cousin and his wife, who live in Charlotte and just lost their home completely in a house fire on Friday (June 14th) afternoon.

    The power came back on after being off from storm damage, and a SURGE PROTECTOR that was still plugged in has been blamed for sparking the blaze that consumed the entire inside of their split level brick home that was in beautiful condition.

    Everything else had been unplugged, but the surge protector didn’t seem to be a risk! Guess it was after all.

    Or maybe it was defective, in which case that company’s insurance is going to get a BIG BILL! Now, they need a place to live! Since it’s for SALE, it just might be an answer to some fervent prayers!

  5. Diane

    Absolutely lovely! The homeowners should consider themselves blessed! Wow!

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