Sears Homes in Atlanta, Georgia

In 2010, I visited Atlanta, Georgia (and surrounding areas), where Nancy (an old house lover, kind soul and Acworth resident) drove me many miles seeking and finding kit homes. Below are a few of the houses we found in the area.

It’s likely that there are many more kit homes in Atlanta. Nancy and I devoted one day to photographing the Magnolia in Piedmont, Alabama (see photo below), and another day we went to small towns north of Atlanta. I’d love to return to Atlanta sometime soon and do a more thorough survey. If you know of a historical society and/or civic group that’d be interested in sponsoring my visit, please contact me by leaving a comment below.

Enjoy the photos!

And if you know of a Sears Home in the Atlanta area, let me know!

Do you live in a Sears Home? Click here to learn the Nine Easy Signs for identifying Sears Homes!

Read today’s blog by clicking here.

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The Magnolia was Sears biggest and best kit home. It was offered from 1918-1922. I literally traveled from my home in Norfolk to Atlanta, mainly to see this house up close and personal. See the actual house in the photo below.

The Magnolia was Sears biggest and best kit home. It was offered from 1918-1922. I literally traveled from my home in Norfolk to Atlanta, mainly to see this house "up close and personal." See the actual house in the photo below.

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One of my favorite photos is this Sears Magnolia in Alabama, just a few miles from the Georgia border!

One of my favorite photos is this Sears Magnolia in Alabama, just a few miles from the Georgia border. Apart from the slightly different dormer up top, this house is a good match to the catalog picture.

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Beautiful brick Alhambra in the heart of Atlanta!

Beautiful brick Alhambra in the heart of Atlanta!

This was Aladdins fanciest home: The Villa

This was Aladdin's fanciest home: The Villa. This is from the 1916 Aladdin catalog. Aladdin was a kit home company that (like Sears) also sold kit homes out of mail-order catalog. In Atlanta, I found more Aladdin kit homes than Sears kit homes. Not surprising, as Aladdin had a massive mill in Greensboro, NC.

The Aladdin Villa in Atlanta! This may be the prettiest Aladdin Villa that I have ever seen.

The Aladdin Villa in Atlanta! This may be the prettiest Aladdin Villa that I have ever seen. It is perfect in every way, and a spot-on match to the original catalog image.

The Aladdin Pasadena was a very popular house

The Aladdin Pasadena was a very popular house

And heres the Aladdin Pasadena we found in Atlanta!

And here's the Aladdin Pasadena we found in Atlanta!

Aladdin Pomona, from the 1919 Aladdin Homes catalog

Aladdin Pomona, from the 1919 Aladdin Homes catalog

Aladdin Pomona in Acworth, a suburb of Atlanta

Aladdin Pomona in Acworth, a suburb of Atlanta. This Pomona is in beautifully original condition! Note the details around the porch gable, and the flared columns and the original siding. It's a real beauty!

The Sears Osborn from the 1921 Sears catalog

The Sears Osborn from the 1921 Sears catalog

One of our most interesting finds was the modern Sears Osborn. It looks like an Osborn - kind of - but its too new and modern. And look at the cornice returns. Most likely, this Sears Osborn is a reproduction, designed by someone who loves Sears Homes!

One of our most interesting finds was the modern Sears Osborn. It looks like an Osborn - kind of - but it's too new and modern. And look at the cornice returns. Most likely, this Sears Osborn is a reproduction, designed by someone who loves Sears Homes!

If you know anything more about these houses, please leave a comment below.

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Click here to see more photos of Sears Homes!

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15 Comments

  1. Nancy McCoy

    Thanks for posting these. I lived in Atlanta from 1990-2006 and loved driving around Midtown and Morningside looking at the homes. I moved back to Toledo, Ohio, when I retired and I have a 1920 American Craftsman bungalow. Can you tell me if American Craftsman and Sears homes were about the same? thanks.

  2. Sears Homes

    @Nancy McCoy
    Thanks for the comment! Send me a photo and I’ll let you know about your 1920 bungalow. 🙂

  3. Thomas Paquette Sr

    Wonderful Photos !! And who would ever have guessed something SOOO informative and historical in nature be found within the GUNK that is normally posted in CL RANTS AND RAVES !.

    As one that has done Many historical restorations from Florida to Boston , I can genuinely appreciate the significance in this ( gold mine find ), WHAT A POTENTIAL MARKET , great Job !.

    I would love to part of that program from a technical standpoint.
    Best Regards Thomas Sr.

  4. Helen

    Thank you for posting these, this is so interesting.

    I live in the suburbs of Atlanta but these homes are beautiful!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  5. Sears Homes

    @Helen
    Thanks, Helen. Please share the link with friends and post it at facebook or twitter. 🙂 Share the happy news with others. Most of the people living in these homes don’t realize what they have!

  6. Sylvia Patterson

    I would love to specialize in selling these homes. Is this for real? Did these homes really come with all the parts in a kit? I would like more history on the Sears kit house. This is very cool. I think I have seen a Magnolia on peachtree battle in Atlanta. The old style architecture in Smyrna Georgia looks like the aladdin Pamona.

  7. Sears Homes

    Hi Sylvia,

    Yes, these are for real. 🙂 Sears sold about 75000 homes and Aladdin sold 75,000 and Gordon Van Tine (another company) sold about 50,000 and Montgomery Ward sold about 25,000. There are a lot of these early 20th Century kit homes around!

  8. Kate

    I just purchased “the Hamilton” style home in Cincinnati, Ohio. I purchased it from the builders 80 year old daughter! I am the 2nd owner. Has original front door, wood floors and kitchen floor. MINT CONDITION. Was wondering if you would like some pics? I am in the midst of cleaning and sanding the cabinets. Cincinnati has a historical village full of the larger kit homes in fabulous condition. Thx so much for your site, I am hooked.

    Sincere Regards.
    Kate

  9. Brandy

    If you make it to the Atlanta area again, please visit Marietta (just north west of the city), Newnan (about 30 mins south west of the city), and Decatur (in town but its own city). Marietta appears at first to be a suburb of Atlanta, but actually predates Atlanta as we know it today. A factory town and a railroad town before that, driving through its streets is a treasure trove of potential kit homes. The neighboring town of Smyrna is particularly rich with 30-50’s ranchers built almost identically.

    Newnan, on the other town, is one of the most awarded towns for its historical districts and the preservation. Many homes predate the Civil War (and survived it in tact), but Newnan also was a steel boom town in the late 1800s-mid 1900s.

    There are entire neighborhoods of what I suspect to be kit homes. Decatur is another treasure trove, both for (suspected) kit homes and (what is the correct term?) the fairy-tale style of small homes popular during the 20’s and 30’s. Clicking through your site and related ones is like old-home-week. I know that I see many of these homes on a regular basis.

  10. Sears Homes

    @Brandy
    I would *love* to visit the area again, Brandy.

    I’m sure you have even more kit homes there. Many more!!!

  11. Greg Camp

    The author stated that she was from Norfolk, Virginia.

    Another great example is the Short House in Larchmont Library, off Manchester. As well, there are also several in Colonial Place, Estabrook, Ocean View, etc.

    Thanks for your work. We really appreciate it.

  12. TheLazyComic

    These are really cool old homes and they have so much style and character. Glad to see these homes are still being kept up.

  13. Dave Radlmann

    I restored the “modern Sears Osborn”. It was an original. For more photos of before and after, please see our case study on:

    http://heirloomdesignbuild.com/current-project-portfolio/renovations-additions-construction/case-study-4-east-lake-renovation/

    When we found it it had been turned into a duplex and we where told we should tear it down do to its rough condition. We are big fans of breathing new life into these historical homes.

    Thanks,
    Dave Radlmann

  14. Rachel J Shoemaker

    Oh, I know where that “Osborn” is! I went through that neighborhood.

    Lots of pattern homes from a source I’m not aware. One thing I noticed is that many of them have those deep cornice returns.

    And knowing that the Osborn was a borrowed design and there are pattern versions of it out there I’d say that and along with the like details of other homes in this neighborhood that it is 100% NOT a Sears Osborn.

    It’s lovely anyway though. 🙂

  15. Brian Davis Gage

    If you get a chance to come back through, I suggest you go to the Wren’s Nest neighborhood just southwest of downtown. It was established as Terminus because it was at the terminating point of the Western and Atlantic railroad–I prime spot for Sears houses to be delivered. My guess is many of the homes there are Pomonas.